Pie Chart Segment

Pull out a segment in an Excel pie chart

Pie charts are great for visually showing categories. Occasionally we might want to emphasise a segment. To do this, we can pull out a pie chart segment!

1 – Create a Pie Chart

Start by selecting your data, going to the Insert tab along the Ribbon and choosing Pie from the Charts subgroup.

Insert Pie

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 – Drag a Segment

Click on the middle of the Pie Chart to select it. Now click and drag a segment out. In this example we wish to draw out the “Net Worth” pie chart segment.

Click Pie Then Drag Segment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You now have a Pie chart with a single segment emphasised.

Finished Pie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you can see this is a very quick way to draw attention to a particular pie chart segment. Read on below for further information on working with pie charts and display options available.

Resources

Changing Excel chart types

Explode or expand a pie chart

 

 

15 Excel Keyboard Shortcuts worth knowing

Save hours in Excel: spend a few minutes learning these shortcuts

Keyboard shortcuts are great time-savers; allowing you to shave seconds off a task, but ultimately saving hours in the long run. This is especially true when you are working with Excel.  There are over 200 Excel keyboard shortcuts that you can use, here we have selected 15 most commonly used shortcuts. Using these shortcuts will make you faster in Excel, thus saving you valuable time.

1 – Switching Between Sheets

Working with multiple worksheets? Try using this Ctrl+PgUp or Ctrl+PgDn, instead of clicking on the tabs for each sheet. Hold Ctrl to scroll through multiple sheets.

Switch between worksheets - Ctrl PgDn or Ctrl PgUp

Sheet Change

 

2 – Currency Format

You can use Ctrl+Shift+$ to apply the Currency format (With two decimals places). Select the cells and apply. Great for Totals!

Currency Format Ctrl+Shift+$

Currency Format

 

3 – Absolute References

If you are writing a formula that needs to point to a fixed cell reference A1, then we would want to make that “absolute” by adding $A$1. The $ locks the row and column. As you type the cell reference, use the shortcut F4 to automatically make it “absolute” by adding in the $ signs.

Absolute Reference

Relative then Absolute

 

4 – Find

It can be useful to search the worksheet or workbook for values or names. Use Ctrl+F to bring up the Find and Replace dialog box. This can save valuable time when you are hunting for something specific.

Ctrl+ F

FindExample

 

5 – New Blank Workbook

When you need a New Blank Workbook, don’t go to File/New try Ctrl+N instead

New Workbook

 

New Blank Workbook

 

6 – Print

When you want to print, use Ctrl+P to open up the Print options rather than clicking on File and heading down to the Print Tab.

Print

Print Icon

 

7 – Save

Saving your work in Excel is essential. You can use Ctrl + S as you work to make sure your everything is safely saved.

Save

 

8 – Save As

If you want to Save As (to create a copy) try F12 instead

F12

 

Saveasexample

 

9 – Editing a Cell

Editing the current cell: you could double click on it, or go up to the formula bar. Save time by using F2.

F2

Edit Cell option

If you make a mistake while editing a formula or want to cancel what you are doing, don’t click off. Press Esc

Esc

 

10 – Automatically Generate a Chart

When you have formatted your data and are ready to insert a chart. Rather than heading to Insert and selecting Chart, just use F11. It will automatically use the data around the active cell (where you are clicked). The Chart will be generated in a new worksheet.

F11

AutoChart

 

11 – Home

As you move around large worksheets, you might want to return to the top left of the data. Ctrl+Home takes you back to A1, faster than scrolling back up.

Home

Home example

 

12 – Select All

Selecting and entire range of data would usually involve clicking and dragging. If that data region was large you could spend time scrolling down the page. Click into the data and use Ctrl+A to select the entire region of data, press again to select the entire worksheet. Great for quickly selecting an entire table

Select All

Select All Example 1

 

13 – AutoSum

Rather than writing the formula to Sum up a range, you can use AutoSumAutoSum

This Function automatically applies the Sum function to calculate the neighbouring cells. Try selecting the cell where you require the total, and use the shortcut  Alt+=.

AutoSum

 

 

 

 

Autosum Example

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14 – Copy/Cut and Paste

Select the cells you want to Copy then use Ctrl+C.

Copy

 

 

Copyexample

 

 

Then Paste it with Ctrl+V.

Paste

Paste example 1

 

 

 

 

If you want to cut the cells, use Ctrl+X

Cut

Cut

 

 

 

Then paste using Ctrl+V

Paste

Cut example

 

 

 

 

15 – Show Formulas

When comparing Formulas on a sheet, it can help if the cell displays the formula  rather than the Value. This option is in the Formula Tab/ Formula Auditing/Display Formulas. Alternatively you can use the shortcut Ctrl+¬ (¬ or the ‘Pipe Key’ is located just above Tab and next to 1 on the keyboard).

Show Formulas

 

Values

 

 

 

Formulas

 

These keyboard shortcuts are but the tip of the Excel iceberg and there are plenty more productivity gains to be had. Check out these resources for further Excel keyboard shortcuts.

The Definitive Guide to Excel Keyboard Shortcuts

Keyboard shortcuts in Excel